A Journey through the Apocalypse of John – Chapter 1

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The next couple months I intend to preach a sermon series on the Apocalypse of John, otherwise known as the book of Revelation. Since I will not be preaching on every passage in the book, but focusing on the main themes throughout, I am writing a weekly devotional material in order to pick up some of the material in between the sermon’s scripture selections. So, without further adieu…

 

Chapter 1

 

“Therefore, write the things which you have seen, and the things which are, and the things which will take place after these things.” – Revelation 1:19

 

The call of God upon all of the prophets was to receive a message greater than themselves and re-communicate it to God’s people. While we traditionally have placed individuals who speak the word of God to us on a pedestal, the biblical reality is significantly different. John here, as Isaiah and Moses before him, does not immediately rejoice at the opportunity to bear God’s word to His people, but instead, upon seeing Christ in His glory, “fell down at His feet as though dead” (v.17). Even one such as John, “in the Spirit on the Lord’s Day” (v.10) finds himself in a state of holy fear at the sight of the resurrected Christ and at the sound of His voice. Jesus then reassures him, and asks him to write the things he sees and the things the Lord will reveal to him.

If the mere sight of Christ is enough to knock John off his feet, how is he to write down the vision he will receive about God’s judgment, redemption, and recreation of the entire world? Often God asks us to do more than we think we can do on our own strength. However, the book of Revelation, John’s Apocalypse, stands as a testimony to the fact that God indeed enables us to do those very things he asks us, whether we believe them possible or not. God delights in using the weak to show His strength and He wants to change the world through us, in ways we could not even imagine.

 

 


 

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